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UVA Lacrosse Player Trial: Defense Seeks Medical Records

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A judge is expected to rule today on whether the lawyers for George Huguely, the former University of Virginia lacrosse player accused of murdering a member of the school's women's lacrosse team, can have access to her medical records, according to Associated Press.

Huguely, 24, who grew up in Chevy Chase, is accused of entering Yeardly Love's apartment in May of 2010 and slamming her head into a wall. Authorities say Love died of head trauma. The two lacrosse players had dated at UVA. 

Attorneys for Hughely argue Love died from an irregular heartbeat caused partially from taking the prescription drug Adderall and drinking alcohol.  Last year, a judged sealed the medical records except for information about the prescription drug. 

The motion was filed in Charlottsville Circuit Court. The trial is expected to start in February. Huguely's attorneys are also expected to argue today that the jury eventually selected for the case be sequestered, and also be questioned individually using a questionnaire and in person, according to the Daily Progress.

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