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Cardin To Run For Re-election In 2012

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Democratic elected officials from around Maryland gathered Nov. 6 to help Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) announce his reelection campaign for the 2012 election. 
Matt Laslo
  Democratic elected officials from around Maryland gathered Nov. 6 to help Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) announce his reelection campaign for the 2012 election. 

Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) is running for another term. The Baltimore native was greeted by loyal supporters along the Baltimore Harbor as Cardin this weekend relayed his plan to seek a second term in Washington. 

"I am running for re-election to the United States Senate," Cardin said to many cheers at the event. 

To opponents, Cardin is seen as a rubber stamp for President Obama. The former House member has voted with his party leaders 98 percent of the time this session of Congress, according to the Washington Post's "Votes Database." But Cardin's allies, such as Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett, say that isn't a bad thing. 

"Someone said to me, 'he's just to intellectual.' Well. 'He's not a loud mouth.' Well. 'He votes with the president.' Well, well, well," he says. "That's why we want him." 

It's still unclear who Cardin will face as his Republican challenger in the 2012 match up. 

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