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Montgomery, Prince George's Cos. Pledge Transportation Cooperation

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Transportation leaders from Montgomery and Prince Georges counties in Maryland are pledging to work together on transit issues. During the counties’ first ever joint work session on transportation, leaders heard updates about the proposed Purple Line from Maryland Transportation Department’s Michael Madden. 

"We are estimating 27,000 jobs will be created over the 30-year life of the project," Madden said. "We’ve also estimated a generation of 1.8 billion dollars."

Gus Bauman, with the state's task force on transportation funding discussed the proposed gas tax increase, of 15 cents per gallon over three years. "This is an increase on the wholesale level," Bauman said. 

Prince George's County Council member Eric Olson, who leads that council's transportation committee, said it's important to keep a dialogue going on issues that affect both counties.  "Really bringing our two counties together made so much sense," he said. 

And Montgomery County Council transportation committee chairman Roger Berliner hopes yesterday's meeting was just the first of many joint meetings.  "Our futures are interwoven, interlinked, and we need to work together to bring it about," Berliner said.

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