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Mayor Voices Concerns Over Security at 'Occupy Baltimore'

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The Mayor of Baltimore says she is concerned about reports of illegal activity in that city's Occupy Baltimore protest encampment near Inner Harbor, according to Associated Press. 

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is worried some of the protesters who've been camping at McKeldin Square for four weeks may be discouraging other protestors from reporting crime to authorities, she tells AP.

Other people, including "addicts and drunks," have begun coming into the encampment, one member of the Occupy Baltimore media team told the Baltimore Sun yesterday. The protesters may vote to determine whether to shut down or move the encampment. The protest was denied a permit to camp in the square last week, but authorities have thus far not evicted protesters from the area.

Police are already investigating one report of an assault and theft at the site. An unidentified woman told investigators she stayed in a man's tent one night over the weekend and awoke to find her money gone.

Representatives with Occupy Baltimore say they are treating this, and other allegations, seriously and have implemented a zero-tolerance policy regarding crime. Meanwhile, Rawlings-Blake says she respects protesters' free speech rights, but adds the park is not for camping and should be open to everyone.

 

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