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Maryland Urges Safety Precautions On Halloween

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Maryland officials are urging trick-or-treaters and their parents to keep safety in mind on Halloween night.
Susy Morris (http://www.flickr.com/photos/chiotsrun/4062910706/)
  Maryland officials are urging trick-or-treaters and their parents to keep safety in mind on Halloween night.

It's Halloween, and that means the afternoon commute will include trick-or-treater dressed up like goblins, ghouls, and other things that go bump in the night. The state of Maryland is trying to make sure it's safe for commuters and pedestrians.

Maryland’s State Highway Administration has launched the "See and Be Seen" campaign; Workers have been handing out free reflective vests at many of the SHA maintenance facilities. The vests will still be available today from until 4 p.m. The trick to this treat, however, is that users must return the free vests by Friday. 

Even with reflective clothing, Dusk arrives earlier this time of year and that will make those trick or treaters harder to see this afternoon and early evening. The SHA is encouraging drivers to stay well within the speed limit and watch out for children darting into the street through crosswalks or between parked vehicles. 

If parents and children walk to trick-or-treat, SHA is warning them to remember to look left, right, and left again when crossing the street, and to make sure to use crosswalks or intersections.

The D.C. Department of Health also weighed in with recommendations of their own. They say that contact lenses that change the color or appearance of eyes should only be prescribed by and purchased from an eyecare specialist. Doing otherwise could lead to infections or the permanant loss of vision. Makeup and facepaint should be FDA-approved and tested out on a small portion of skill to check for potential allergic reactions.

Makeup and face paint should be FDA-approved. 


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