Lawsuit Filed Against Maryland Redistricting Map | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Lawsuit Filed Against Maryland Redistricting Map

Play associated audio

 

A Maryland man has sued over the Congressional redistricting map that was passed by the General Assembly last week.

Western Maryland resident Howard Gorrell, who attended all 12 redistricting hearings this summer, filed the lawsuit Thursday in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, Md.  

Gorrell, who is from Smithsburg, contends the map dilutes the voting power of agriculture-related electorates in the 6th Congressional district. The map moves a large portion of Democratic-controlled Montgomery County into that western Maryland district. 

Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and a panel that created a preliminary map say the map reflects changing demographics along the Interstate-270 corridor. Democrats did openly admit the changes will help them as they to unseat incumbent Rep. Roscoe Bartlett (R-Md.), who's held the District 6 seat since 1993.

 

NPR

Impressionist Hero Édouard Manet Gets The Star Treatment In Los Angeles

Manet was not himself an Impressionist, but he mightily influenced the movement. Two of his paintings are now in L.A. The Railway is making its West Coast debut, and Spring just sold for $65 million.
NPR

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

Scientists have recovered cultivated wheat DNA from an 8,000-year-old submerged site off the British coast. The finding suggests hunter-gatherers were trading for the grain long before they grew it.
NPR

Congress Will Vote On Homeland Security; Agency's Funding Ends Tonight

Both the House and Senate are expected to vote on bills to fund the DHS Friday, with the Senate possibly giving its support to House Republicans' idea of funding the agency for three weeks.
NPR

'Ballot Selfies' Clash With The Sanctity Of Secret Polling

New Hampshire is the first state to outlaw voting booth selfies. Some call the ban unconstitutional and are challenging it in court. Others argue selfies compromise privacy and enable voter coercion.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.