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Maryland Launches Waste-To-Energy Initiative

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The state of Maryland is looking to buy electricity generated from animal waste. When waste from chicken and cows gets into streams and waterways, it winds up polluting the Chesapeake Bay, causing algae blooms and dead zones. 

But when it's put into a digester and broken down by bacteria, it can produce gas that can be used to produce energy. Maryland is looking for suppliers who can make that happen as part of the Clean Bay Power project.  

Energy suppliers must be able to generate up to 10 megawatts and be connected to the regional electricity grid. They'd have to start supplying power to the state by the end of 2015.

Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, who launched the project Thursday, says the effort will promote the use of renewable energy, reduce the amount of agricultural pollution that reaches the Chesapeake Bay, and encourage job creation. The state's goal is to have 20 percent of energy come from renewable sources by 2022.

NPR

A Compelling Plot Gives Way To Farce In Franzen's Purity

The new novel reveals sharp observations and a great, sprawling story. But critic Roxane Gay says the book gets bogged down with absurdly-drawn characters and misfired critiques of modern life.
NPR

Huge Fish Farm Planned Near San Diego Aims To Fix Seafood Imbalance

The aquaculture project would be the same size as New York's Central Park and produce 11 million pounds of yellowtail and sea bass each year. But some people see it as an aquatic "factory farm."
WAMU 88.5

Europe's Ongoing Migrant And Refugee Crisis And The Future Of Open Borders

The Austria-Hungary border has become the latest pressure point in Europe's ongoing migrant crisis. An update on the huge influx of migrants and refugees from the Middle East and Africa and the future of open borders within the E.U.

WAMU 88.5

Environmental Outlook: How to Build Smarter Transportation And More Livable Cities

A new report says the traffic in the U.S. is the worst it has been in years. Yet, some urban transportation experts say there's reason to be optimistic. They point to revitalized city centers, emerging technology and the investment in alternative methods of transportation. A conversation about how we get around today, and might get around tomorrow.

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