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Maryland Launches Waste-To-Energy Initiative

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The state of Maryland is looking to buy electricity generated from animal waste. When waste from chicken and cows gets into streams and waterways, it winds up polluting the Chesapeake Bay, causing algae blooms and dead zones. 

But when it's put into a digester and broken down by bacteria, it can produce gas that can be used to produce energy. Maryland is looking for suppliers who can make that happen as part of the Clean Bay Power project.  

Energy suppliers must be able to generate up to 10 megawatts and be connected to the regional electricity grid. They'd have to start supplying power to the state by the end of 2015.

Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, who launched the project Thursday, says the effort will promote the use of renewable energy, reduce the amount of agricultural pollution that reaches the Chesapeake Bay, and encourage job creation. The state's goal is to have 20 percent of energy come from renewable sources by 2022.

WAMU 88.5

Rita Dove: "Collected Poems: 1974 - 2004"

Rita Dove's poetry career has spanned more than forty years. During that time she won a Pulitzer Prize and became the first African-American poet laureate of the United States. Now she's released a new edition of collected works. Rita Dove on a life lived in verse.

NPR

U.S. To Ship Peanuts To Feed Haitian Kids; Aid Groups Say 'This Is Wrong'

On paper, the USDA's plan to send surplus peanuts to feed 140,000 malnourished Haitian schoolchildren sounds heroic. But aid groups say it could devastate Haiti's peanut farmers.
WAMU 88.5

Back From The Breach: Moving The Federal Workforce Forward

A year after a massive cyber breach compromised the databases of the Office of Personnel Management, Kojo talks with OPM Acting Director Beth Cobert about her agency and key issues facing the federal workforce.

WAMU 88.5

Why Medical Error Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The U.S.

New research shows medical error is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., killing more than 250,000 people a year. Why there are so many mistakes, and what can be done to improve patient safety.

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