D.C. Officials: Sewage Project Will Raise Rates, Bring Jobs | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

D.C. Officials: Sewage Project Will Raise Rates, Bring Jobs

Play associated audio
D.C.'s plans to overhaul its sewage treatment system will mean pretty significant cost increases for users. 
Jessica Gould
D.C.'s plans to overhaul its sewage treatment system will mean pretty significant cost increases for users. 

Massive upgrades to the city’s sewer system will cause a major spike in residents' water rates, according to D.C. officials. But they also hope the giant construction project will lead to new jobs for District workers. 

As part of a federally mandated project, D.C. Water is planning to build three huge tunnels to capture the combination of stormwater and sewage that flows into local rivers during heavy rains. The agency broke ground on the project yesterday in Southwest D.C.

The machine used to build the tunnels is as big as a football field, and the project is the city's largest since the construction of Metro. But with a $2.6 billion dollar price tag, the project is going to be costly. An average retail customers' bill is expected to increase from $60 to $100 by 2010. 

Despite the costs, Mayor Vincent Gray says the project provides a major opportunity for D.C. residents. 

"We are going to make sure that these jobs that are created are going to the people of the District of Columbia and the people who live right here in Ward 8," he says.

The project is expected to reduce sewage overflows by 96 percent, and is scheduled to be complete in 2025. 

NPR

Director Mike Nichols Remembered As A Comedian, Raconteur, Charmer

Robert Siegel remembers director and film icon Mike Nichols, who died Wednesday of a heart attack at 83.
NPR

Moderate Drinker Or Alcoholic? Many Americans Fall In Between

A study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that 1 in 3 adults drinks excessively. That means eight or more drinks per week for women, and 15 or more drinks a week for men.
NPR

'I Will Not Sit Idly By' And Other Congressional Tweets On Immigration

Congress is out of session until the first week of December, so many members are weighing in on the president's speech on Twitter and other platforms — with mixed reactions.
NPR

Keep Your Head Up: 'Text Neck' Takes A Toll On The Spine

Newly published research finds that common texting posture can put as much as 60 pounds of force on the cervical spine.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.