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Cantor: Occupy Wall Street 'More Divisive' Than Tea Party

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House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) is no longer saying that Occupy Wall Street protesters amount to "mobs," but he says they're divisive in ways that tea partiers are not, according to Associated Press.

In comments to reporters Tuesday, the Virginia Congressman refused to repeat or renounce his comment over the weekend that the protests in New York and Washington are being carried out by "mobs." But, he said, these protests are "very different" than the tea party protests last year, in that they are pitting Americans against other Americans. Tea partiers, Cantor said, directed their ire at the government.

Democrats noted that Cantor didn't object to the tea party's in-your-face confrontations with lawmakers last year. The Occupy Wall Street protesters, including a subgroup, "Occupy DC" that has been camping out in McPherson Square for almost two weeks,  say they represent all Americans except the wealthiest 1 percent.

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