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Freedom Plaza Protesters Not Budging

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Protesters have occupied Freedom Plaza for four days as part of the Stop the Machine demonstration coinciding with the 10-year anniversary of the invasion of Afghanistan. They may face arrest later today when their permit expires.
Armando Trull
Protesters have occupied Freedom Plaza for four days as part of the Stop the Machine demonstration coinciding with the 10-year anniversary of the invasion of Afghanistan. They may face arrest later today when their permit expires.

Despite the weekend expiration of their demonstration permit, and a police order to leave by 2 p.m., protesters continue to camp out on Freedom Plaza in downtown D.C. Monday afternoon. It's been a largely peaceful, calm protest, in spite of their defiance of the police order.

As of 4 p.m., D.C. Police are lining up on the perimeter of the plaza. There have been no arrests so far, and Park Police have stayed on the edges of the demonstration all day, with the exception of two officers who came onto the promenade about 30 minutes after the 2:00 p.m. teardown deadline to ask to speak privately with the leaders of the demonstration. 

At first the demonstrators refused, but then, the two people who say their names on the original permit for the so-called "Occupy DC" protest left for a private meeting with park police.

Several dozen protesters remain on Freedom Plaza as they await an update on the meeting with law enforcement.

Protesters had gathered in Freedom Plaza as part of the Stop the Machine protest meant to coincide with the 10-year anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. The main organizers of this protest say they will remain here and defy the U.S. Park Police. The Park Police have not said whether they will arrest the protesters if they don't leave the plaza.

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