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DC Lottery Seeks Input On Online Gaming

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D.C.'s push to become the first jurisdiction to have state-sponsored, online gambling has been delayed, in part because of the lack of public input. Language authorizing the program was slipped into the budget last December without a public hearing. 

Officials with DC Lottery, which would implememt the new gaming sites that would benefit the city, now say they will hold community meetings in each of the city’s eight wards over the next two months to address concerns over online gaming. 

Some residents have voiced concerns about the lack of transparency and input and two D.C. Council members are now calling for the law to be repealed. In response to the criticism, lottery officials promised to hold community meetings before rolling out the program. The first one is scheduled for Oct. 13 in Ward 5.

Council member Jack Evans, who chairs the Council committee with oversight over the online gaming program, says he will hold a hearing once all of the community meetings finished. 

As to what happens next,  Evans says the "jury is out."

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