WAMU 88.5 : Morning Edition

Filed Under:

Two Men Sickened By Wild Mushrooms

Play associated audio
 
The fact that a Frederick, Md. man was poisoned by "destroying angel" mushrooms, shown here, has led health officials to warn against eating fungus found in the wild.
Kathie Hodge (http://www.flickr.com/photos/cornellfungi/472539114/)
  The fact that a Frederick, Md. man was poisoned by "destroying angel" mushrooms, shown here, has led health officials to warn against eating fungus found in the wild.

Wild mushrooms are sprouting up everywhere after all the wet weather recently, and doctors at Georgetown University are warning against eating them after two men became ill.

There have been two separate cases of mushroom poisoning in the past two weeks. In Springfield, Va., Frank Constantinopla and his wife picked mushrooms to cook in a stir fry. Within hours of eating the fungi known as "death cap" mushrooms, they felt sick, according to Associated Press. His symptoms were worse, and within days, he was suffering from the early stages of liver failure. 

One week later, a retired farmer from Frederick, Md. fell ill with mushroom toxicity. (He had eaten another poisonous mushroom known as the 'destroying angel,' according to a GU statement.) Doctors at Georgetown were able to administer both men a drug that's currently still in clinical trials, and they are now recovering.

Health officials say people should buy their mushrooms from legitimate farms or grocery stores.

NPR

Texas Bookseller Picks 3 Summer Reads

Julia Green of Front Street Books recommends Moonlight on Linoleum by Terry Helwig, City of Women by David R. Gillham and The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly.
NPR

He Used To Live On The Streets Of Mumbai. Now, His Cafe Welcomes Everyone

Amin Sheikh's new cafe is a rarity in class-stratified India: It's open to people from all walks of life. Sheikh is a former street child, and so are many of his employees.
NPR

For Many Black Voters, Trump's 'What Do You Have To Lose?' Plea Isn't Enough

Donald Trump promises to help bring jobs and security to black neighborhoods. But his poll numbers with African-Americans are in the low single digits, and many say his message is insulting.
NPR

WATCH: Squishy 'Octobot' Moves Autonomously

The robot designed by a team from Harvard University moves without the help of any rigid parts. Researchers say it is the first proof-of-concept design for an entirely soft, autonomous machine.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.