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D.C. To Change Rules For Tanning Salons

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D.C. government officials are looking at new regulations for tanning salons. The new law would require parental consent for tanning customers under the age of 18.
Valerie Yermal (http://www.flickr.com/photos/valerieyermal/5108104005/)
D.C. government officials are looking at new regulations for tanning salons. The new law would require parental consent for tanning customers under the age of 18.

Officials in D.C. are preparing to overhaul regulation for tanning salons. 

The city released 74 pages of draft rules and regulations for tanning salons, covering everything from the temperature of tanning beds to the type of eyewear that should be worn by customers while tanning. 

The new rules would also affect who can use the salons. It would make it illegal for anyone under 14 to use the tanning beds, and teenagers under the age of 18 would need parental consent.

The rules could be finalized in 30 days. Other changes include mandated warnings for customers about the dangers of extended exposure to UltraViolet rays, fines of up to $10,000 for salons that don’t follow the rules, and a requirement that all new tanning salons would need to get a license from the District’s Department of Health. 

 

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