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D.C. Elections Board Probes New Gray Aide

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The D.C. Board of Elections is investigating Mayor Vincent Gray's new deputy chief of staff for voting in the District while residing in Maryland.

The voting irregularities by deputy chief of staff Andrea Pringle were uncovered by activist Dorothy Brizill of the watchdog group DCWatch. In an email newsletter sent to readers Aug. 31, Brizill contends that "while [Pringle] lived in Bethesda, she voted in the September primary election in the District, according to the records of the Board of Elections."

Brizill filed a formal complaint with the elections board Sept. 1 challenging the legality of Pringle's vote.

Gray appointed Pringle, along with a new chief of staff, Christopher Murphy, Aug. 30. His former chief of staff, Gerri Mason Hall, resigned in March amid the scandals plaguing the Gray administration. 

In a statement released this week, Pringle says she voted in Washington because she had not yet severed ties to the city, or established residency in Montgomery County. She later apologized for what she describe as an error.

Pringle, a former political consultant on Howard Dean's 2004 presidential bid, says she plans to move back to the District. An elections board spokeswoman says any infractions found will be referred to the U.S. Attorney's office.





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