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O'Malley Asks Shore Residents For Storm Damage Assessments

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Hurricane Sandy caused major flooding in Ocean City, Md. last October.
Bryan Russo
Hurricane Sandy caused major flooding in Ocean City, Md. last October.

Maryland leaders are asking victims of Hurricane Sandy to report all damages and estimates as the state plans to appeal FEMA's decision to deny aid to victims on the Eastern Shore.

As expected, Gov. Martin O'Malley will appeal the decision, but before he does, he wants more information on the damage the storm left behind.

Residents in Dorchester, Somerset, Worcester, and Wicomico Counties are being asked to contact the Maryland Department of Human Resources Relief Hotline and give a detailed summary of damage to their homes.

Officials from FEMA, and MEMA are reportedly back on the lower shore trying to assess all the damage as the state plans their appeal.

A disaster declaration was granted for state and local governments and some non-profit organizations, but the request to help individual homeowners was denied on the grounds that the federal government believed state and local governments and volunteer efforts would suffice during the recovery process.

The hotline number to call is 888-756-7836.

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