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Local News from WAMU 88.5

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

D.C. Drinking Water Satisfies Standards But Quality Can Vary

The D.C. Water and Sewer Authority has released its 2010 drinking water quality report. The results will be sent to every household in the District.

Kwame Brown's Brother Filed For Bankruptcy Before Release Of April Audit

Court records show that Che Brown, the brother of D.C. Council Chair Kwame Brown and a key figure in the scandal surrounding Kwame Brown's 2008 election campaign, filed for bankruptcy in March.

Aerial Boardwalk Tram Proposal Pulled In Ocean City

Proponents of a proposal to construct a monorail-like tram 85 feet above the Ocean City Boardwalk have withdrawn the idea after developers met with city officials.

Virginia's Education Secretary Heads South

Virginia's education secretary, Gerard Robinson, is leaving the Commonwealth for Florida.

Water Outage Still Affecting 700 In Baltimore

Approximately 700 customers in East Baltimore who have been without water since Saturday will have to wait a little longer for service after repairs to a water main break failed to hold.

D.C. Looks To Soften President's Park

Some say the security features at President's Park in downtown D.C. make it less attractive. But a makeover is now in the works for this popular landmark.

GOP Lawmakers Rain On Virginia Surplus Parade

News that Virginia may end the fiscal year with at least a $100 million budget surplus has prompted mixed reactions from Republican lawmakers.

Virginia Is Creating New Guidelines For Use Of Sewage As Fertilizer

With the price of oil rising in the past year, and the price of petroleum-based fertilizer going up, more farmers in Virginia are considering sludge from sewage treatment plants. They can get it free, but the Commonwealth isn't sure about the safety of so-called biosolids.

Fairfax Summer Schools Return, But Not Completely

Today is the last day of school for students in Fairfax County, and soon, summer classes will begin. Well, at least some of them will.

Metro Employee Union Reaches Out To Riders

The second anniversary of the Red Line train crash that killed nine people at Fort Totten Metro Station is this week, and and the occasion has Metro's employee union trying to bridge a gap between workers and passengers.

Foreclosure Prevention Group Jeopardized By Funding Cuts

Though the pace of foreclosures has slowed, some worry that looming federal funding cuts could put organizations that offer free foreclosure prevention counseling out of business.

Lyme Disease Doesn't Always Stem From Tick Bites

Although the reported number of cases of Lyme disease in the region has dropped in recent years, the health hazard remains, and not all cases of the disease are transmitted by ticks.

D.C. Council Reform Proposed By Lawmaker

As the D.C. Council battles questions of unethical or unwise behavior, one member is introducing legislation to deal with some of the issues surrounding the scandals.

Manassas Park Seeks Exemption From Parts Of Voting Rights Act, Gets Support

The Justice Department is supporting a legal effort by the Virginia city of Manassas Park that would grant relief from portions of the Voting Rights Act.

For Some In D.C., Greening Infrastructure Proves Frustrating

When it comes to slowing down pollution, nature can sometimes do a better job than humans or machines. There's a place in Northeast D.C. where that idea is being used to filter stormwater.

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