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Local News from WAMU 88.5

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Seven Of D.C. Fire's Ladder Trucks Fail Inspection

The union representing D.C. firefighters is criticizing the fire department for the poor inspection record of the city's fleet of ladder trucks.

Review Of Relisha Rudd's Disappearance Raises Questions On Training, Reporting

Advocates for the homeless in D.C. say that a city-led review of the case of an 8-year-old who was taken from the D.C. General shelter earlier this year raises as many questions as it answers.

Monday, September 8, 2014

'The Rent Is Too Damn High' Sloganeer Now Working For Hailo Taxi App

To compete with the popular UberX, e-hailing service Hailo has cut its fares and hired a new spokesperson, a somewhat infamous New York City mayoral candidate.

Report: D.C.'s Aggressive Ticketing Leaves Drivers Struggling To Prove Innocence

A report from the D.C. Inspector General says that policies and practices at three agencies responsible for handing out tickets for parking and moving violations make it harder for drivers to prove their innocence.

Severance Charged With Three Alexandria Killings, Won't Face Death Penalty

A grand jury in Alexandria has charged Charles Severance with murdering Nancy Dunning, Ron Kirby and Ruthanne Lodato, three homicides that shook the quiet communities in which they occurred.

Senate Sets Hearing On D.C. Statehood Bill, First In 20 Years

A Senate committee has scheduled a hearing on a bill that would grant statehood to the District of Columbia, the first open debate on a statehood measure in Congress in over two decades.

Commentary: Report On Relisha Rudd Misses The Big Picture

Judith Sandalow of the Children's Law Center says focusing on who is at fault for the disappearance of 8-year-old Relisha Rudd misses the larger structural issues that contributed to the situation.

Should Lawmakers Use 'Franking Privilege' On Facebook Ads, Online Polls?

Incumbent politicians enjoy a "franking privilege" which allows them to send mail to constituents on the taxpayer's dollar, but new, digital ways of reaching out to voters have blurred the lines of what's acceptable.

Controversy Over Redskins Name Follows Team To Houston

Debate over the name of Washington's football team continues to haunt the franchise — a Redskins rally the night before Sunday's loss to the Texans was followed by protests from activists in Houston.

Delaware Schools Struggle To Make Room For Unaccompanied Minors

It's not just the D.C. Metro area that has had to respond to an influx in Central American — Delaware's largest school district is also trying to figure out how to provide these kids the support they need.

Sunday, September 7, 2014

Some Perspective As Ocean City's Summer Season Winds Down

In a summer punctuated by headlines about pole dancing street performers, Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan says that, all things considered, it went pretty well for the resort town.

Ethics Reform To Get Another Pass In Virginia, Politicians Say

Virginiaw lawmakers tried to address ethics reform this year, but in the wake of the conviction of former Gov. Bob McDonnell and his wife Maureen, they saw more changes are on the way.

Scientists Marvel At Resilience Of Underwater Grasses In Chesapeake Bay

Beds of sea grass were nearly wiped out on the Susquehanna Flats during a hurricane 40 years ago, and scientists are just now unlocking the mysteries of how these important plants were able to bounce back.

Public Art In D.C. Is Back With Return Of '5x5' Program

D.C.s' largest temporary public art program returns beginning in September and running through December, with new art works across the District.

Friday, September 5, 2014

In Maryland's Poorest County, Free Meal Program Could Go A Long Way

Maryland's Somerset County is the first in the state to implement a federal nutrition program that will provide free breakfast and lunch to all of its public school students.

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