Local News from WAMU 88.5

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Developer To Pay $1.3 Million Over Shoddy House-Flipping Claims In D.C.

A couple accused of overseeing the shoddy renovation of dozens of D.C. homes they later sold has agreed to pay $1.3 million in restitution to buyers. They will also be banned from doing any future construction, renovations or sales of any properties in the city.

Monday, June 6, 2016

SafeTrack To Affect D.C. Students 'Tremendously,' Both In Summer And Fall

More than 8,500 students use Metro to get to and from school. How will SafeTrack delays hit schools in the weeks and months ahead?

Friday, June 3, 2016

Metro Sees Unprecedented 'Crush Loads' Unless Riders Find Alternatives

With fewer trains running next week, Metro is looking at just how bad the crush of bodies could get on some cars. Some of the numbers are eye-opening.

With Late-Night Metro Service Gone, Many Wonder: Is The Party In Washington Over?

Metro will now close at midnight instead of 3 a.m. on weekends — and the change has business leaders worried about the nighttime economy and bartenders and building cleaners struggling to find alternate ways home.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Is The Region Really Ready For The Beginning Of Metro's SafeTrack Plan?

With SafeTrack starting this weekend, local counties, businesses and above all commuters need to have plans in place for how they will cope. Some are questioning whether we're really ready for the maintenance surges.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

$15 Minimum Wage Advances In D.C., With Compromise On Tipped Workers

A D.C. Council committee has approved a bill raising the city's minimum wage to $15 and giving tipped workers a pay hike from $2.77 to $5.55 an hour.

Va. Supreme Court To Hold Special Session On Suit Against Felons' Voting Rights

A lawsuit that attempts to block more than 200,000 felons from voting this fall will be considered by the Virginia Supreme Court when it meets for a special session next month.

LISTEN: The 2016 Hurricane Outlook From The Capital Weather Gang

Is D.C. due for a tropical storm this summer? We talk about the Capital Weather Gang about their predictions for the hurricane season.

When It Comes To Long, Difficult Rehab Programs, Metro's Problems Aren't Unique

Much about the transit quandary in and around the nation's capital can seem singular, but in San Francisco, New York and elsewhere, riders are facing the same underinvestment, deferred maintenance, political and management decisions.

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

In New Budget, D.C. Government Pokes At Congress

Your move, Congress. That was the message the D.C. Council sent to Capitol Hill on Tuesday when it gave final approval to the city's 2017 budget.

With Final Vote, D.C. Moves To Close D.C. General Homeless Shelter

The D.C. Council on Tuesday gave final approval to Mayor Muriel Bowser's plan to close the troubled D.C. General homeless shelter, replacing it with seven smaller facilities scattered across the city.

As SafeTrack Begins, Family Of Carol Glover Wonders What Could Have Been

When smoke filled a Metro car in January of 2015, it claimed the life of 61-year-old Carol Glover. Now more than 16 months later, her family is still feeling that loss acutely.

Friday, May 27, 2016

Two Transportation Bills Are Part Of Maryland Governor's Slate Of Vetoes

Gov. Larry Hogan has vetoed five bills, including one concerning a bridge on U.S. 301, and another that would increase oversight of the state's transit agency.

Verizon, Unions Reach Deal In Principle For Four-Year Contract

About 39,000 landline and cable employees in nine eastern states and Washington, D.C., have been on strike since April. They had been working without a contract since last August.

Do The Roots Of Mental Health Issues Lie In Early Childhood?

There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that many chronic mental and physical health problems have their roots in early childhood, when kids' brains are just developing. But what should parents, teachers, doctors look out for?

Pages