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Local News from WAMU 88.5

Thursday, June 23, 2011

While Metro Police Face Cutbacks, Federal Anti-Terror Funds Flow

Metro's Board of Directors is scheduled to cast its final vote on the transit system's budget this morning, and that may include a cut for its Police Department - the first such reduction in at least six years. But while Metro's crime fighting resources might be going down, it's budget for terrorism prevention is going up.

NASA To Use Aircraft To Help Improve Air Quality Monitoring

Starting next week, aircraft will fly noticeably low over the Baltimore-Washington area. NASA will be conducting a series of flights as part of a program designed to help improve how satellites monitor air quality, NASA atmospheric scientist Dr. James Crawford tells WAMU's Pat Brogan. Some will fly as low as 1,000 feet over major roadways.

Nats Manager Jim Riggleman Resigns

Nationals manager Jim Riggleman resigned after a 1-0 victory over the Seattle Mariners Thursday afternoon.

After Hearing On Sheen's Police Escort, Policy Still Unclear

D.C. police continue to take heat for providing a police escort for actor Charlie Sheen as he rushed to a performance in April. Police Chief Kathy Lanier and other law enforcement officers were called before the council Thursday for an explanation.

Obama's Afghanistan Withdrawal Plan Faces Local Skepticism

Many of the region's lawmakers are viewing President Obama's plan to withdraw thousands of troops from Afghanistan with skepticism, though for different reasons.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Grand Jury Investigates Gray Campaign

A grand jury is now investigating the allegations against the 2010 campaign of D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray, NBC Washington reports.

Traffic Lights Malfunctioning In Montgomery Co. For Morning Commute

More than 200 traffic lights were out of sync in Montgomery County Wednesday morning, and the malfunction is expected to tie up traffic around the Interstate-270 corridor through the morning commute. The computer system has been restored and the lights are now functioning normally.

On Anniversary Of Red Line Crash, Metro Remembers Victims

On a day that marked the second anniversary of the Red Line train crash near the Fort Totten Metro station, emotions ran high among victims' families as they called for the city to dedicate a park to the nine people that died.

D.C. Council Eyes More Ethics Reform Bills

With several ongoing scandals and outside investigations, the D.C. Council continues to look at ways it can better police itself.

D.C. Water Report Highlights Methods Used To Purify Water

The release of the D.C. Water and Sewer Authority's 2010 drinking water quality report not only details how clean the water is, but the methods the authority uses to make it that way.

Skepticism About New Cigarette Labeling at Local Tobacco Shop

The Food and Drug Administration is forcing tobacco companies to make the most significant changes in cigarette packaging in 25 years, but not everyone thinks it'll make a difference.

Md. Could Lose $2 Million Per Home Game If NFL Cancels Season

Maryland, which is home to two NFL football teams, would lose an estimated $40 million in tax revenues if the NFL's season is canceled because of a labor dispute, according to the Maryland comptroller's office.

New Virginia Laws Offer 'Second Chance' For Ex-Offenders

Virginia state officials have launched a renewed effort to help ex-offenders adjust to life “on the outside."

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

Silverdocs, wooden works, a plein air showdown and plenty of theater productions.

Officials Link Man Detained During Pentagon Scare To 2010 Shootings

Officials tell the Associated Press that evidence has linked the man who was detained near the Pentagon Friday, Yonathan Melaku, to shootings at military buildings in 2010.

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