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Local News from WAMU 88.5

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Families Of Metro Crash Victims Share Raw Emotions

Two years ago, a packed rush-hour Metro train traveling at nearly full-speed crashed into another train near the Fort Totten station. It was the deadliest accident in Metro's history. Families shared grief, and anger, at a memorial service Wednesday.

Frederick County Examines Third-Grade Social Studies Textbook

The Frederick County School Board in Maryland is reviewing a third-grade social studies textbook, which some parents say is promoting a liberal agenda.

James Abbatiello: Would I Be A Good Dad?

James Abbatiello, a science teacher at Hammond Middle School in Virginia, learned he would be a good father when he saved someone else's son.

Tune Inn Fire: D.C. Takes To Twitter

A fire struck Capitol Hill restaurant and bar Tune Inn around 7 a.m. today, and caused moderate damage, according to D.C. Fire and EMS.

Grand Jury Investigates Gray Campaign

A grand jury is now investigating the allegations against the 2010 campaign of D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray, NBC Washington reports.

Traffic Lights Malfunctioning In Montgomery Co. For Morning Commute

More than 200 traffic lights were out of sync in Montgomery County Wednesday morning, and the malfunction is expected to tie up traffic around the Interstate-270 corridor through the morning commute. The computer system has been restored and the lights are now functioning normally.

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Foreclosure Prevention Group Jeopardized By Funding Cuts

Though the pace of foreclosures has slowed, some worry that looming federal funding cuts could put organizations that offer free foreclosure prevention counseling out of business.

Lyme Disease Doesn't Always Stem From Tick Bites

Although the reported number of cases of Lyme disease in the region has dropped in recent years, the health hazard remains, and not all cases of the disease are transmitted by ticks.

The Hill's Alex Bolton: Debate Over Action In Libya Creates GOP Friction

Tensions are increasing between Republicans in the Senate and the House over the U.S. military intervention in Libya, The Hill's Alex Bolton tells WAMU's Pat Brogan. Also, President Obama will address the nation Wednesday about withdrawing troops in Afghanistan.

D.C. Council Reform Proposed By Lawmaker

As the D.C. Council battles questions of unethical or unwise behavior, one member is introducing legislation to deal with some of the issues surrounding the scandals.

Local Smokers Doubt Impact Of New Cigarette Labels

The Food and Drug Administration unveiled several new warning labels Tuesday that graphically depict the negative effects of tobacco use. But local smokers and health professionals have doubts about whether the labels will make a major difference.

Manassas Park Seeks Exemption From Parts Of Voting Rights Act, Gets Support

The Justice Department is supporting a legal effort by the Virginia city of Manassas Park that would grant relief from portions of the Voting Rights Act.

D.C. Council Looks To Restore Public's Confidence

With several unresolved scandals among the District's politicians, two more D.C. Council members have offered suggestions for improvement.

For Some In D.C., Greening Infrastructure Proves Frustrating

When it comes to slowing down pollution, nature can sometimes do a better job than humans or machines. There's a place in Northeast D.C. where that idea is being used to filter stormwater.

Kaya Henderson Confirmed As D.C. Schools Chancellor

It's official: Kaya Henderson is D.C.'s permanent schools chief. Henderson was confirmed Tuesday by a unanimous vote at the D.C. Council.

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