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Local News from WAMU 88.5

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

West Nile Virus Shows Up In District

The West Nile Virus has been found in mosquitoes in the District, and officials are warning people to take precautions.

Mount Ranier Cop Indicted For Attemped Murder

Gene Gillette, a police officer in Mount Rainier, Md., is due in court today after being indicted for attempted murder and sex offense charges in relation to a shooting in Capitol Heights earlier this month.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

D.C. Council Chair Stops Short Of Calling For Harry Thomas' Resignation

D.C. Council Chair Kwame Brown is calling on Council member Harry Thomas Jr. to "seriously consider what's best for his family and constituents," but in comments Monday, he didn't go so far as to ask him to resign Monday.

Casey Anthony Trial Prompts 'Caylee's Law' Bill In Virginia

Members of the Virginia State Crime Commission say the Commonwealth should move forward in enacting a version of "Caylee's Law," a bill prompted by the high profile disappearance of Florida toddler Caylee Anthony.

FAA Shutdown Continues: Employees Still Furloughed, Projects Stopped

The furlough continues for thousands of Federal Aviation Administration workers today as they wait for lawmakers to renew their funding.

Whooping Cough On The Rise In Virginia

Cases of whooping cough are on the rise in Virginia. So far this year, seven outbreaks have been reported according to AP.

Va. Governor To Sign 'Ashley's Law' In Alexandria

Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell heads to Alexandria today to sign the measure known as Ashley's Law.

The Hill's Alex Bolton: So Many Debt Limit Plans, So Little Time

Talks on the debt limit negotiations are largely stalled, as Democrats and Republicans now work on their own separate plans. Alex Bolton, senior staff writer for The Hill newspaper, talks with WAMU All Things Considered host Pat Brogan about the current status of talks.

New School Site Selection Angering Many In Montgomery County

Council members in Montgomery County are getting involved in a little-recognized but very contentious debate: how the sites for new school buildings are chosen. Now, the council is trying to determine what authority it has over the site selection process.

Redskins Return To Work

With the end of the NFL lockout, the Washington Redskins are back to work.

Minister Is On A Mission To Help The Anacostia River

The Anacostia River is eight miles long and home to a diversity of birds and fish. These days, however, you're more likely to spot a soda bottle floating downstream than a sturgeon, shad or striped bass. But one local minister is on a mission to save the river.

Va. Governor Visits Alexandria to Sign "Ashley's Law"

Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell visited Alexandria today for the ceremonial signing of "Ashley's Law" - named after a local resident killed in a traffic accident in 2008.

D.C. Charter Schools Chair Talks Test Scores, Discrimination Allegations

Approximately forty percent of children in the District attend charter schools -- institutions financed by public funds but not subject to the same rules and regulations that govern traditional public schools. Brian Jones, chairman of D.C.'s public charter school board, sat down with WAMU's Kavitha Cardoza to talk about school test scores, the choices the schools provide, and allegations of discrimination.

DC Water GM Says Ruling Could Affect Water Bills

A judge's ruling requiring federal regulators to come up with tougher pollution standards for the Anacostia River has the head of the DC Water District's water utility concerned.

Blacktop's Plays Don't Just Play It Straight

The 2011 Capital Fringe Festival marked the debut of a new theater company in Washington. A handful of recent George Mason graduates started the group, and a glimpse of their Fringe submission makes one thing obvious: when they put on a play, they do mean play.

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