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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, July 5

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"Enter the Orchids" demonstrates the bright, vibrant colors used in Jennifer Brewer Stone's oil paintings of tropical flora and fauna.
Photo courtesy of The Art League
"Enter the Orchids" demonstrates the bright, vibrant colors used in Jennifer Brewer Stone's oil paintings of tropical flora and fauna.

Jul. 5-Aug. 9: The Burning of Visibility: From Reality to Dream

You can see a collection of work by French photographer Anne-Lise Large through August 9 at the Art Museum of the Americas F Street Gallery. The Burning of Visibility: From Reality to Dream features work from three series: Lost Angels, Mythology, and Margins. The artist captured the images while travelling around the United States during a three-year, self-imposed study of the "American Dream." The exhibit includes more than 30 portraits of people working toward their own notions of progress.

Jul. 5-Aug. 5: Fantasy of the Real

Objects overlap and colors pop in Fantasy of the Real, a new exhibit of oil paintings by Jennifer Brewer Stone. The artist paints layers of tropical flora and fauna on her canvases, highlighting colorful shapes and textures with her graphic compositions. The exhibit will be on view at The Art League Gallery in Alexandria through August 5.

Music: "Just A Dream (Instrumental)" by Nelly

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