WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Feb. 12, 2013

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Richard Schiff (right), of "West Wing" fame, makes his Shakespeare Theatre Company main stage debut in Hughie.
Carol Rosegg
Richard Schiff (right), of "West Wing" fame, makes his Shakespeare Theatre Company main stage debut in Hughie.

Feb. 12-Mar. 10: Spring Awakening

Teenage angst ignites the cast of Spring Awakening, a rock 'n roll tale about growing up and asking life's big questions. Olney Theatre Center is kicking off its 75th anniversary season with the Tony Award-winning musical, which follows a group of young people as they stumble through their adolescence, dealing with parents, school, and the discovery of the opposite sex. You can see the production through March 10.

Feb. 12-Mar. 17: Hughie

Emmy Award-winning actor Richard Schiff takes to the stage as the main character in Eugene ONeill's Hughie, a play about two lonely men living, and chatting, in New York City. When Erie Smith's illusory sense of grandeur begins to fade, he confides in a hotel night clerk, played by Randall Newsome. You can catch the two-man show at The Shakespeare Theatre Company's Lansburgh Theatre through March 17.

Music: "My Generation (Instrumental)" by The Who

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Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

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