WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

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Art Beat With Jacob Fenston, Nov. 26, 2012

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Sandstone pinnacles rise through the orange sand dunes of Karnasai Valley in Chad.
Courtesy of George Steinmetz/National Geographic
Sandstone pinnacles rise through the orange sand dunes of Karnasai Valley in Chad.

Nov. 27 Deserts from the sky

National Geographic photographer George Steinmetz is obsessed with taking pictures of the earth from air. He's gone to 27 countries plus Antarctica, and used a motorized paraglider - basically a kite with what looks like a box fan for a motor - to shoot some of the most remote areas of the globe. His photos of the world's deserts are stunning and surreal, and they're on display at the National Geographic museum in D.C. Tomorrow night Steinmetz will be speaking at the museum, sharing his images and stories of how he got them.

Nov. 26 David Schulman at Iota

And tonight, local jazz composer and violinist David Schulman plays music from his new album "Quiet Life Motel." Schulman is also a radio producer, and his music, which you're hearing now, is layered with rich movie-like soundscapes. Schulman is joined by bassist Eddie Eatmon and Felix Contreras playing percussion. That's 8 p.m. at the Iota Club and Cafe in Clarendon.

Music: "Bachata Luna" by David Schulman.

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