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Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Aug. 20

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The writing's on the wall at Hirshhorn. And the floor. And the escalators. And parts of the ceiling.
Barbara Kruger
The writing's on the wall at Hirshhorn. And the floor. And the escalators. And parts of the ceiling.

(Aug. 20-2014) Belief+Doubt=Sanity

If you're heading to the Hirshhorn you'll want to be warned about the writing on the wall, and the floor, and the escalators, and parts of the ceiling. Barbara Kruger's Belief+Doubt opens today. The acclaimed artist -- based on both coasts -- is famous for her photomontages, but in recent years she's been playing with language--big, bold language. Hirshhorn's entire lower level lobby is covered in her red, white, and blank vinyl words that confront the viewer's perceptions of democracy, power, and belief. The installation will be around through 2014, so you don't have to run.

(Aug. 20) Lucky Dub=Kennedy

If you're heading to the Kennedy Center tonight you'll want to be warned about Lucky Dub. The Washington band is playing a free show on the Millennium Stage. As the name suggests, Lucky Dub's sound owes a fair amount to reggae and good fortune, but the band loves to draw on funk, jazz, ska, and Latin grooves too.

Music: "Jamaica Rum" by Greyhound


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