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Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, June 18

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Ambrotypes remind us to take the negative with the positive.
Library of Congress
Ambrotypes remind us to take the negative with the positive.

(June 18-June 2013) They're ambrotypes

A hundred and fifty years ago the latest and greatest innovation in photography was the ambrotype. The process involved placing an underexposed negative on glass before putting it on top of a dark backing to make it look positive. You can see some of that negativity and positivity come to life at the National Portrait Gallery's East Wing. Ambrotypes of abolitionists and Civil War leaders are showing through June of next year.

(June 18-Sept. 9) Drawing Space

British artist Antony Gormley makes bodies. He makes them with ink, he makes them with iron, he makes them miniature, and he makes them the size of buildings. All of Gormley's pieces investigate the human body's relationship to space. A collection of his drawings and prints made over the past 40 years using blood, soil, and bleach is showing at the Phillips Collection in Northwest through early September.

(June 18-Sept. 2) Graphic Details

The Washington DC Jewish Community Center has Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women through early September. The collection highlights the funny, outrageous, poignant, and intimate voices of Jewish women in graphic storytelling.

Music: "Darktown Strutter's Ball" by Django Reinhardt


From Trembling Teacher To Seasoned Mentor: How Tim Gunn Made It Work

Gunn, the mentor to young designers on Project Runway, has been a teacher and educator for decades. But he spent his childhood "absolutely hating, hating, hating, hating school," he says.

Native American Tribe Bets On Olive Oil

Once impoverished, California's Yocha Dehe tribe found success with a casino complex. Now the tribe is using its newfound wealth to grow, bottle and sell premium olive oil.

Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

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