WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Filed Under:

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, June 18

Play associated audio
Ambrotypes remind us to take the negative with the positive.
Library of Congress
Ambrotypes remind us to take the negative with the positive.

(June 18-June 2013) They're ambrotypes

A hundred and fifty years ago the latest and greatest innovation in photography was the ambrotype. The process involved placing an underexposed negative on glass before putting it on top of a dark backing to make it look positive. You can see some of that negativity and positivity come to life at the National Portrait Gallery's East Wing. Ambrotypes of abolitionists and Civil War leaders are showing through June of next year.

(June 18-Sept. 9) Drawing Space

British artist Antony Gormley makes bodies. He makes them with ink, he makes them with iron, he makes them miniature, and he makes them the size of buildings. All of Gormley's pieces investigate the human body's relationship to space. A collection of his drawings and prints made over the past 40 years using blood, soil, and bleach is showing at the Phillips Collection in Northwest through early September.

(June 18-Sept. 2) Graphic Details

The Washington DC Jewish Community Center has Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women through early September. The collection highlights the funny, outrageous, poignant, and intimate voices of Jewish women in graphic storytelling.

Music: "Darktown Strutter's Ball" by Django Reinhardt

NPR

Not My Job: Sharon Jones Gets Quizzed On Handshakes

We've invited the lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings to play a game called "Let's shake on it."
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
NPR

Pitching A 'Clintonville' Protest During The Democratic Convention

Anti-poverty activists organized a tent city in one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods to protest the Democratic National Convention.
NPR

How Your Health Data Lead A Not-So-Secret Life Online

Apps can make managing health care a lot easier, but most don't have the privacy protections required of doctors and hospitals. And a simple Web search can clue in advertisers to health concerns.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.