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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Feb. 6

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Smoky scientist Victor DeNoble blows the whistle in Addiction Incorporated.
Addiction Incorporated
Smoky scientist Victor DeNoble blows the whistle in Addiction Incorporated.

(Feb. 7-19) Electile Dysfunction

Two thousand twelve stands to be a big year for politics and the District has its fair share of political theater, art and film to see you through it. Electile Dysfunction is showing at Northwest Washington's Theater J through the 19th. The musical satire stars a group of drag queens vying for the Republican presidential nomination.

(Feb. 6-26) Love, Politics & Scrabble

Alexandria's Del Rey Artisans has Love, Politics & Scrabble until the last weekend of February. Artists depict the various games people play throughout life, ranging from Monopoly to manipulation.

(Feb. 6-9) Addition Incorporated

For a political documentary Washington's E Street Cinema has Addiction Incorporated through Thursday. The film follows scientist and whistleblower Victor DeNoble through the 80s and 90s as he engineers a "safer cigarette" that ended up proving the addictive properties of nicotine.

Music: "New Breed" by James Brown

NPR

Black Leadership In The Age Of Obama: A Look Back

PBS NewsHour co-anchor Gwen Ifill joins All Things Considered from the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, to discuss her 2009 book The Breakthrough. Ifill is re-examining the book's conclusions about black political leadership as President Obama prepares to leave office.
NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
NPR

On A Night Capped By Obama, Democrats Aim To Stress National Security

On the third night of the Democratic National Convention, party officials are rolling out some of their heaviest hitters — including headliner President Obama.
NPR

Police Use Fingertip Replicas To Unlock A Murder Victim's Phone

Michigan State University engineers tried 3-D-printed fingertips and special conductive replicas of the victim's fingerprints to crack the biometric lock on his Samsung Galaxy phone.

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