WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Jan. 23

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Arlington's Amy Hughes Braden studies tweens in 'Too Extroverted to Paint'
Artisphere
Arlington's Amy Hughes Braden studies tweens in 'Too Extroverted to Paint'

(Jan. 23) Joshua Bell, but it will cost you

Violin virtuoso Joshua Bell once played a free set incognito at the L'Enfant Plaza Metro station. It was part of a Washington Post experiment to see whether or not anyone would notice they were walking past a world-class musician. Few did. You can see Bell take on Brahms, Ravel, Gershwin and many more tonight at The Kennedy Center, but it will cost you.

(Jan. 27-Feb. 26) Workhouse Theatre's Art

Workhouse Theatre's latest production is Art. It's not just the human application of creativity and imagination; the play is actually called "Art." A group of friends relentlessly debates the nature of art, beauty and inevitably friendship in the production running through late-February.

(Jan. 23-Mar. 11) Too Extroverted to Paint

Arlington's Artisphere has some art that may spur debate through early-March. Arlington native Amy Hughes Braden presents colorful large-scale portraits of tweens who are stuck in a world of tweets and tags in Too Extroverted to Paint.

Music: "Violin Solo" by Aphex Twin

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Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
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After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
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On The Clock: Rubio Gets The Most Talking Time In Tonight's Debate

It was the last debate before the New Hampshire primary and Donald Trump was back onstage. Which GOP candidate ended up with the most talking time?
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How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

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