WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Jan. 23

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Arlington's Amy Hughes Braden studies tweens in 'Too Extroverted to Paint'
Artisphere
Arlington's Amy Hughes Braden studies tweens in 'Too Extroverted to Paint'

(Jan. 23) Joshua Bell, but it will cost you

Violin virtuoso Joshua Bell once played a free set incognito at the L'Enfant Plaza Metro station. It was part of a Washington Post experiment to see whether or not anyone would notice they were walking past a world-class musician. Few did. You can see Bell take on Brahms, Ravel, Gershwin and many more tonight at The Kennedy Center, but it will cost you.

(Jan. 27-Feb. 26) Workhouse Theatre's Art

Workhouse Theatre's latest production is Art. It's not just the human application of creativity and imagination; the play is actually called "Art." A group of friends relentlessly debates the nature of art, beauty and inevitably friendship in the production running through late-February.

(Jan. 23-Mar. 11) Too Extroverted to Paint

Arlington's Artisphere has some art that may spur debate through early-March. Arlington native Amy Hughes Braden presents colorful large-scale portraits of tweens who are stuck in a world of tweets and tags in Too Extroverted to Paint.

Music: "Violin Solo" by Aphex Twin

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These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

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Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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