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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Oct. 25

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Agnes Bolt explores the relationship between artist and art collector at Washington's Project 4 Gallery.
Agnes Bolt
Agnes Bolt explores the relationship between artist and art collector at Washington's Project 4 Gallery.

(Oct. 25-Nov. 26) Let’s make a deal
Polish artist Agnes Bolt presents Dealing at Project 4 Gallery on U Street. The collection of photography, video, and audio installations playfully documents the relationship between the artist and an art collector. Bolt actually set up a transparent plastic studio in the middle of a collector’s house for a week to explore how an artist inevitably makes work based on the desires of consumers. Life imitated art and art imitated life and the results are on display through late November.

(Oct. 25) Future Islands, Black Cat
Baltimore’s Future Islands plays at Northwest’s Black Cat tonight. The art-pop trio started off making dance music driven by beats reminiscent of '80s favorites like Devo and New Order. The group’s latest effort is filled with slower love songs, sung theatrically by a crooner that owes a little to Bowie, a little to Meat Loaf and a lot to emotional turmoil.

Music: “Little Dreamer (Jones Remix) [ft. Victoria Legrand]” by Future Island

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