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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Oct. 19

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All sorts of choice art and photojournalistic shots are up for auction in Picture Equality.
Critical Exposure
All sorts of choice art and photojournalistic shots are up for auction in Picture Equality.

(Oct. 20) Picture Equality
D.C.’s Critical Exposure is on a mission to empower young people through the art of photography. Tomorrow night they get a little help from a number of celebrated professionals, including Pulitzer Prize-winners and contributors to National Geographic. Fetching images are auctioned off in Picture Equality at the DLA Piper Building in Northwest Washington.

(Oct. 20-23) VelocityDC Dance Festival
VelocityDC brings four days of dance to Washington’s Sidney Harman Hall beginning tomorrow. The group’s annual dance festival features a broad selection of the region’s top talent.

(Oct. 19) Karaoke King? Karaoke Queen?
If you missed your golden opportunity to be a rock star there’s a second chance tonight at Chief Ike’s Mambo Room in Adams Morgan. A live band plays everything from Janis Joplin to Justin Timberlake and invites you to provide the vocal stylings in the event that combines karaoke and teenage fantasy.

Music: “Baba O’Riley” by The Who

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