WAMU 88.5 : All Things Considered

Filed Under:

Virginia Delegate Brings AK-47 To State House Floor

Play associated audio
 
Del. Joe Morrissey brandishes an AK-47 on the floor of the Virginia House of Delegates.
  Del. Joe Morrissey brandishes an AK-47 on the floor of the Virginia House of Delegates.

The gun control debate became personal on the floor of the Virginia House of Delegates Thursday. Henrico Delegate and Democrat Joe Morrissey wanted to make a point about the gun debate and he chose to do it by holding up an AK-47 on the assembly floor.

"So I brought an AK-47 with me," Morrissey said. "Here's the AK-47, pointed at the ceiling, unloaded." Members in the chamber were audibly shocked at the presence of the weapon.

Virginia House Republicans have resisted efforts to ban assault weapons and high-capacity clips as well as block any attempt to close the gun show loophole.

Earlier in the session, the Assembly viewed a secretly recorded video showing an elected official purchasing a firearm without a background check. 

Republican Delegate Jackson Miller said he was in the market for an AK-47.

"And I wouldn't mind if he secretly videotaped the transaction, Mr. Speaker. Thank you," Miller said.

NPR

A Love Letter To Literature: Reading Gabo In 'The Paris Review'

Gabriel Garcia Marquez died Thursday. It would be hard to overstate the importance of his novels, but author Gustavo Arellano recommends getting to know him in a different medium.
NPR

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

The giant retailer says it's adding a new line of organic food that's at least 25 percent cheaper. But a large-scale production and supply of organic food likely can't be achieved overnight.
NPR

Are Democrats Trying To Energize The Base With The Race Card?

Top Democrats have said recently that some GOP opposition to President Obama and his agenda is based on race. It's an explosive message that might drive Democratic voters to the polls.
NPR

Tech Week: Earnings, A Heartbleed Arrest And Digital Distraction

Fears of a bubble continue as tech titans reported their quarterly earnings; the culture of digital distraction finds more critics; and fallout from the Heartbleed bug raises questions for government.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.