News Archive | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

News Archive - August 22, 2014

Scotland's Independence Vote And The Fate Of Britain's Nuclear Subs

The Scottish vote next month but it's not entirely clear whether they would keep the pound and the BBC. And then there's the naval base with Britain's nuclear subs.

McDonnell Corruption Trial: Former Gov Defends Relationship With Jonnie Williams

On the stand today, the former Virginia governor defended his relationship with the businessman at the heart of the trial, saying it was appropriate.

Bustin' Loose In Langdon: Chuck Brown Memorial Park Unveiled

Fans and family flocked to D.C.'s Langdon neighborhood to witness the unveiling of Chuck Brown Memorial Park.

DDOT Issues New Safety Rules For Sidewalks In Construction Zones

The District's Department of Transportation has issued new rules requiring construction companies to provide safe pedestrian accommodations in work zones.

Suicide Bombing In Iraq Kills Dozens Of Sunni Worshippers

The attack, which killed more than 60 worshippers at Friday prayers, is the latest sectarian violence to rock the deeply divided country.

Interview: Former D.C. Police Officer Talks About Relations With the Community

Ronald Hampton served on MPD for 23 years, and this week he spoke with WAMU 88.5 this week about relations between the community and police in the 1970s and how Ferguson now reflects D.C. then.

California Trees Nailed As The Source Of Mystery Infections

Nobody knew how people in Southern California were getting infected with the life-threatening fungus C. gattii. A 13-year-old helped figure out the source: three types of trees.

White House: Islamic State Has 'Gained Capacity' In Recent Months

Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes said the beheading of American journalist James Foley is tantamount to an act of terror against the U.S.

'More That Could Have Been Done' To Help Foley, His Brother Says

Faulting the U.S. approach to hostage situations like the one his brother, James Foley, was in, Michael Foley says, "We are sitting on prisoners in Guantanamo. It doesn't even have to be financial."

Chinese Fighter Buzzed U.S. Navy Plane In 'Dangerous Intercept'

Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said the Chinese warplane made several close passes by an American P-8 Poseidon, doing a barrel roll and flying wingtip to wingtip in an "aggressive" manner.

D.C. Charter Leader Objects To Plan Setting Aside Seats For At-Risk Students

The leader of D.C.'s charter school board says that he opposes an initiative adopted by Mayor Vincent Gray that would set aside a certain percentage of seats at high-performing charter schools for at-risk students.

If You're Too Sick To Fly, Airlines Might Not Offer A Refund

Airlines have the right to refuse a passenger suspected of having Ebola. But if you're sick with a contagious disease, what are your rights when it comes to canceling and refunds?

Nestle Nudges Its Suppliers To Improve Animal Welfare

The world's largest food company is requiring all of its suppliers of dairy, meat, poultry and egg products to comply with tighter animal welfare standards. Animal rights groups applaud the move.

Scientists Searching For Alien Air Pollution

Looking for extraterrestrial smog may be a good way to search for alien intelligence, according to a Harvard researcher.

Coming Soon To A Pole Near You: A Bike That Locks Itself

Cyclists may soon have a convenient way to discourage bike thieves, thanks to new designs that use parts of the bikes themselves as locks.

Despite Result, 200th Anniversary Of Battle Of Bladensburg Will Be Celebrated

The 1814 Battle of Bladensburg wasn't one of America's shining moments on the battlefield, but that's not stopping Prince George's County from commemorating its 200th anniversary with a series of events this weekend.

McAuliffe Creates Task Force To Combat Campus Sexual Assaults

The task force will include college administrators, law enforcement and members of the governor's cabinet, and will be chaired by Attorney General Mark Herring.

As McDonnell Speaks For Third Day, Trial Against Him Becomes Therapy Session

Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell has spent two days speaking about the troubles of his marriage, and a third day of testimony is aimed at making the case that he could not have conspired with a wife he was barely speaking to.

'Courtesy Vans' To Serve Areas In D.C. That Taxi Drivers Stay Away From

The D.C. Taxicab Commission unveiled a plan to bring vehicle-for-hire services to underserved neighborhoods in the form of “courtesy vans,” a concession by officials that most regular cab drivers will continue to refuse to go to certain areas of D.C.

Eggs, Milk And Ink: Venezuela Wants All Supermarket Shoppers Fingerprinted

The government hopes to clamp down on rampant cross-border smuggling of government-subsidized staples that has caused shortages on the country's store shelves.

In Riots Sparked By An Ebola Quarantine, A Teen Is Shot And Dies

Protesters were on the move. Soldiers fired. A teenage boy suffers wounds to both legs. For half an hour, no one could find an ambulance and no one came to care for him.

Who Owns A Monkey's Selfie? No One Can, U.S. Says

The U.S. Copyright Office says a monkey's photo can't be copyrighted — by the person who owns the camera or by anyone else — because it wasn't taken by a human.

Insurers Refuse To Cover Some Contraceptives, Despite Health Law

An insurer denied free coverage for NuvaRing, a small birth control device that works for three weeks at a time by releasing hormones similar to those used by birth control pills.

Hamas Executes Suspected Informants After Deadly Israeli Strike

One day after an Israeli airstrike killed three of its senior military leaders, Hamas says it has killed more than a dozen people it believes were spying for Israel.

Russian Convoy Crosses Ukraine Border Despite Kiev's Protests

The white trucks, which Moscow says are carrying only humanitarian aid, have been held up at the border for more than a week over fears they could be a ruse to resupply separatists.

U.S. Prisoner Swap For Bergdahl Broke The Law, GAO Says

The Pentagon didn't give enough notice to Congress and misused nearly $1 million when it swapped Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five Taliban leaders, the Government Accountability Office says.