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Maryland Gubernatorial Candidates Square Off In Ocean City

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Anthony Brown and Larry Hogan faced off—sort of—for the first time since each man secured the nomination of their party to be Maryland's next governor.

Democratic nominee Brown and Republican pick Hogan both addressed the Maryland Association of Counties summer conference over the weekend in Ocean City.

It was not a debate, as both candidates appeared seperately under a format that did not allow any interaction between them. Both unleashed harsh attacks, with Hogan saying Brown would continue "anti-business" policies, and the lieutenant governor in return charging that Hogan would try to repeal Maryland's new gun regulations which were upheld as constitutional by a federal judge last week.

But there was common ground on at least one issue during the conference: the ALS ice bucket challenge, which has been sweeping across social media to help raise awareness and money to find a cure for the disease. Hogan and his running mate Boyd Rutherford did it first, and just a few hours later, Brown and his running mate Ken Ulman followed suit.

Things will likely be much drier—and contentious—when Brown and Hogan meet face to face for their first debate in October.

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