WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Virginia Watermen Call For Changes In How Blue Crab Population Is Managed

The Virginia Blue Crab Industry Panel wants state regulators to move away from daily limits and seasonal restrictions on crabbing.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/fishfoot/572458758
The Virginia Blue Crab Industry Panel wants state regulators to move away from daily limits and seasonal restrictions on crabbing.

A group of commercial watermen is calling on the Virginia Marine Resources Commission to radically change the way it manages the state's Blue Crab population.

The Virginia Blue Crab Industry Panel wants state regulators to move away from daily limits and seasonal restrictions on crabbing, and create a pilot program that would experiment with annual limits instead.

"Say you get 2,000 bushels. We give you 2,000 tags. You've got to tag your 2,000 bushels and when you run out of tags, you're out of the fishery until next year," explains Ken Smith, president of the Virginia Watermen's Association.

Smith says this would allow watermen to make more money by letting them fish whenever profit margins are greatest — while still meeting conservation goals.

"You can't continually put 'em out of business, and make it so they don't make money, when there's a way out there that they can make money and we can have a sustainable fishery too," says Smith.

A spokesperson for the state's marine resource commission says some of the panel's proposals have merit, but cannot be implemented without coordination from Maryland and other bay states.

The spokesperson also says the proposals may not be appropriate for the many different types of crabbing and crab habitats across Virginia waters.

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the last few years, that has started to change. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Republicans Warn Of High Energy Costs With Obama's 'Clean Power Plan'

Republican leaders in Virginia say Obama's clean energy plan would drive up energy costs and damage a struggling economy. Democrats say saving the planet is more important than the short-term problem of higher energy bills.
NPR

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Young entrepreneurs in Africa say that they're leading a tech movement from the ground up. They think technology can solve social ills. But critics wonder if digital fixes can make a dent.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.