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Born And Live In D.C.? You're In The Minority

In 2012, 37 percent of D.C. residents were born in the city.
Mr. T in D.C.: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mr_t_in_dc/1782961516/
In 2012, 37 percent of D.C. residents were born in the city.

Are you a D.C. resident that was born here? If so, you're in a distinct minority.

In 2012, only 37 percent of the District's residents were born in the city, the third-lowest proportion in the entire country. In Nevada, only 25 percent of residents were born in the state, while in Florida 36 percent of residents were also born there.

The findings come from U.S. Census data crunched and visualized by The Upshot, a politics and policy website run by The New York Times.

According to historical data, D.C. has always been a city of transients: Since 1900, the highest proportion of residents born here came in 1970, when it hit 49 percent. In the 1940s and 50s, it bottomed out at 33 percent.

The data also shows that in 2012 five percent of D.C. residents were born in New York, four percent in Virginia and Maryland apiece, and three percent in California, North Carolina and Pennsylvania. Historically, it was Virginians that topped the list of out-of-staters living in D.C., but they were overtaken by New Yorkers after the 2000 census.

Of course, as with many rankings that compare D.C. to the states, there is a caveat: When compared to other cities, D.C. isn't too far off the mark when it comes to residents who were also born here. D.C. is also the smallest "state" in these samples.

In Virginia in 2012, 49 percent of residents were born in the commonwealth, though that number has steadily fallen over the last century — in 1910, for example, it was 90 percent. In 2012, four percent of Virginia residents were born in New York, while three percent hailed from North Carolina or Pennsylvania. (This might help explain why there are pockets of New York Yankees fans in D.C. and Virginia.)

In Maryland, 48 percent of residents were born there according to the 2012 census, while nine percent hailed from D.C. and four percent from Pennsylvania.

One thing that D.C., Maryland and Virginia have in common in the increase in foreign-born residents since 1980. In 2012, 16 percent of D.C. residents were born outside the U.S., up from seven percent in 1980. In Maryland, the increase over that same period was five to 15 percent, and in Virginia it went from four to 13 percent.

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