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Death Of James Brady, Former White House Press Secretary, Ruled A Homicide

The death of former White House Press Secretary James Brady has been ruled a homicide by Virginia's Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. The medical examiner's office says he died as a result of the injuries he suffered during the assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan in 1981. The case is now under investigation by D.C. Police.

Brady, who suffered a bullet wound to his head outside D.C.'s Hilton Hotel, died earlier this week. Brady lived through hours of surgery and further operations after the shooting, but never made a full recovery. He was a prominent gun-control advocate and used his experience to launch a campaign against gun violence.

The ruling means the shooter, John Hinckley, could face new criminal charges. Hinckley was found not guilty for the attempted assassination of Reagan by reason of insanity and is currently a patient at St. Elizabeths psychiatric hospital in Washington.

Earlier this year, a federal judge accepted a recommendation from the hospital that Hinckley be allowed to leave the facility for 17 days a month—up from 10 days—in order to stay with his mother in Williamsburg, Virginia under various conditions such as keeping away from government centers as well as areas where the president or members of Congress may be visiting.

NPR

Pack These Pages: Three Must-Reads For Summer

Harriet Logan, owner of Loganberry Books in Shaker Heights, Ohio, recommends a graphic novel about trash, a George Eliot classic and a children's book about a bear pianist.
NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
WAMU 88.5

Why Local Nonprofits Haven't Fixed Poverty

As long as there has been poverty, there have been people trying to end it. We explore the obstacles and inefficiencies local nonprofits run into when trying to solve society's stubborn problem.

WAMU 88.5

Can We Trust Our Cars?

There were more airbag recalls this week, and VW has agreed to pay nearly fifteen billion in its emissions cheating scandal. Meanwhile, cars with driverless technology are becoming available, but whether they will make us safer is up for debate. A look at auto safety and consumer trust.

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