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Barry Owes $2,800 In Unpaid Tickets, Car Impounded

D.C. Council member Marion Barry (D-Ward 8) will have to pay $2,800 in outstanding tickets if he wants to get his car back.
Kipp Baker: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mrpixure/3135421163/
D.C. Council member Marion Barry (D-Ward 8) will have to pay $2,800 in outstanding tickets if he wants to get his car back.

D.C. Council member Marion Barry's (D-Ward 8) car is sitting in a city tow yard after being impounded by police.

As first reported by The Washington Post, city records reveal Barry has racked up $2,800 in unpaid parking and speeding tickets on his Jaguar since 2012. The news comes two days after Barry was cited following a collision with another car on Pennsylvania Avenue SE this past weekend.

Officials with the D.C. Department of Motor Vehicles say Barry was allowed to keep driving his car despite owing the city for 21 separate tickets totaling $2,824 because he was ticketed at night, when towing and booting crews are not working.

Barry will have to pay the tickets to recover the car. After the first 24 hours of being impounded, he'll be on the hook for $20 daily impoundment fees. If he doesn't pay up to recover his car within 28 days, the city can auction it off or scrap it.

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