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Organizers Pull Plug On Virgin Mobile Freefest This Year

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The Virgin Mobile Freefest will not return to the Merriweather Post Pavilion this year.
Baltamour Carla: https://flic.kr/p/9jpwWp
The Virgin Mobile Freefest will not return to the Merriweather Post Pavilion this year.

This year's Virgin Mobile Freefest is cancelled, but organizers aren't giving many details why.

For the past five years, thousands of concertgoers have flocked to Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia for Virgin Mobile FreeFest, a benefit concert that helped support homeless youth. When the free tickets ran out, which they quickly did, music fans could volunteer their time or money in exchange for a ticket.

But even though the music is stopping, a spokesperson for Virgin Mobile says the company will continue its philanthropic tradition by making a "significant" donation directly to the Sasha Bruce RE*Generation House, a shelter built with money from the Freefest. It opened in 2012 and houses eight young people who have nowhere else to go.

Merriweather Post Pavilion operator Seth Hurwitz says the concept of Freefest is "fantastic" and his company, I.M.P. Productions, is exploring options to continue the festival.

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