News Archive | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

News Archive - July 24, 2014

With Protest Against Congressman, Activists Take A Stand For D.C. Home Rule

This protest was presumably about marijuana decriminalization, but home rule seemed to be the overarching theme.

Police Investigating Video Of Man Urinating On Former Ravens Owner's Grave

A video posted online shows what appears to be a Cleveland Browns fan urinating on Art Modell's grave in Maryland.

Two Dead, Dozens Injured On Eastern Shore After Reports Of Tornado

A violent storm touched down at the Cherrystone campground near Cape Charles, Va., just minutes after a tornado warning went out at 8:20 a.m.

In First Week Of New Law, D.C. Police Write Five Tickets For Pot Possession

Police in the District of Columbia issued five citations for marijuana possession in the first week of a new law that decriminalized possessing small amounts of marijuana.

Senate Bill Would Give New Power To D.C. Government

A Senate subcommittee has approved a major spending bill that would grant the District of Columbia full control over its local budget and laws.

UNICEF Report On Female Genital Mutilation Holds Hope And Woe

The practice is on the decline in many countries. But the population boom in Africa and the Middle East will put millions of girls at risk unless more progress is made.

The Weird, Underappreciated World Of Plastic Packaging

So much of the food we eat these days is encased in plastic. And behind it is a whole lot of research and innovation. We dive into some of the materials that keep food fresh and portable.

DOJ Reaches Agreement For Oversight Of Albuquerque PD

The deal follows a Justice Department report released in April that showed the city's police used excessive force in dealing with many suspects.

5 Things I Learned About TV's Future From The Critics Press Tour

From being mistaken for Randy Jackson to confronting network executives about diversity issues, TV critic Eric Deggans runs down highlights of the two-week blizzard of parties and press conferences.

U.S. Teens Still Lag In Getting Vaccinated Against HPV

Eight years after the FDA approved the first vaccine against HPV, only 57 percent of female teens and 35 percent of male teens have been inoculated, the CDC says. Are doctors partly to blame?

4 Theories About Why Wal-Mart Changed Its U.S. Chief

Wal-Mart, the nation's biggest company, affects the lives of millions of workers and shoppers. So its U.S. leadership change is attracting lots of interest. Here are some theories about what happened.

2 Dead, 20 Injured At Eastern Shore Campground After Reports Of Tornado

Strong storms swept over Virginia's Eastern Shore on Monday, killing two and injuring nearly two dozen others at a campground.

This Suit Keeps Ebola Out — So How Can A Health Worker Catch It?

The head-to-toe protective gear is designed to prevent Ebola from infecting health care workers, yet some do contract the disease. It's not the suit's fault. It's likely a case of human error.

U.S.: Russia-Based Artillery Targeting Ukrainian Troops

The State Department says it has evidence that Moscow is lobbing artillery across its border at Ukrainian government forces, and that the Kremlin plans to ship rocket artillery to the rebels.

Central American Presidents Say U.S. Shares Responsibility For Migration Crisis

The presidents of Honduras and Guatemala also called for more aggressive cooperation with the U.S. to curb the violence and poverty they say is driving child migrants to the U.S.

Hot Prisons Could Be Deadly For U.S. Inmates, Advocates Warn

Un-air-conditioned jails and prisons are often uncomfortable for both prisoners and for guards. But for inmates whose health conditions make them sensitive to the heat, they pose serious health risks.

Zoo In Argentina Says 'Sad Bear' Too Old To Go To Canada

The plight of the nearly 30-year-old polar bear, who lost his enclosure mate two years ago, has attracted attention from well-wishers the world over who want him moved.

Syrian President Issues New Stamps, But Can't Deliver The Mail

The set of three stamps commemorates Bashar Assad's recent presidential election victory. But what seems like a mundane occurrence says a lot about power in the war-torn country.

When Federal Privacy Laws Protect Hospitals Instead Of Patients

A 1996 law has been cited to scold a mom taking a picture of her son in a hospital and to keep information away from police investigating a possible rape at a nursing home.

Ukraine's Prime Minister Quits After Allies Withdraw From Coalition

The Svoboda and Udar parties pulled out of the governing coalition, prompting Arseniy Yatsenyuk's decision. Parliament's speaker said it was up to the two parties to name a temporary prime minister.

Study: 15 Percent Of Virginia Kids Live In Poverty

Virginia was ranked in the top fifth of states in measures of childhood well-being, but statistics on the economic security of families showed a decline.

Globe-Trotting Virus Hides Inside People's Gut Bacteria

Scientists have discovered what may be the most common virus in people worldwide. The tiny critter doesn't make us sick but may be involved in obesity and diabetes.

Congress Unlikely To Approve Plan On Immigrant Children Until After Recess

The political response to the tens of thousands of unaccompanied immigrant children in the country is largely split along partisan lines, and legislation is not forthcoming.

European Court Rules Against Poland In CIA 'Black Sites' Case

The European Court of Human Rights said Poland broke the European human rights convention by allowing the CIA to imprison and torture two terrorism suspects in secret prisons on its soil.

U.S. Database Glitch Delays Passport, Visa Processing

The problem in the U.S. State Department system could cause problems for millions of people worldwide who are awaiting travel documents.

Shades Of The Middle Ages: The Plague Popped Up In China And Colorado

Is this 2014 or 1348? The plague — yes, the infamous Black Death — was reported in China and Colorado. It's the same disease as the Middle Ages pandemic. Only now we know how to treat it.

D.C. Council Weighs Resident Concerns About Soccer Stadium Land Swap

A key part of the proposed D.C. United stadium deal involves handing off the Reeves Center — a valuable piece of real estate in northwest that some in the District say could fetch a higher price on the open market.

Israeli Artillery Hits U.N.-Run School In Gaza

More than a dozen people have been killed at the school used as a shelter in Beit Hanoun, according to Palestinian officials.

Montana Sen. Walsh Says PTSD May Have Played A Role In His Plagiarism

Sen. John Walsh lifted at least a quarter of his United States Army War College master's thesis, according to a report in The New York Times. Walsh was appointed to the Senate in February.

Iraq Elects Kurdish Politician To Ceremonial Post Of President

Fouad Massoum, who has a long history in Iraqi politics, took the oath of office vowing to protect the constitution and the unity of the country.

Saving Lives In South Miami, One Pool At A Time

Swimming pool drowning rates among school-aged black children are more than five times higher than they are among white kids the same age.

A Simple Way To Reduce Stroke Risk: Take Your Pulse

Most people can't tell when they're having the irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation that puts them at risk of stroke. Simply learning to take your own pulse could help, researchers say.

Gaza Conflict Day 17: Here's What You Need To Know

For the first time since Tuesday, the Federal Aviation Administration is allowing flights to Israel. The death toll in Gaza has now surpassed 700.

Air Algerie: Jet Likely Crashed In Mali With 116 Aboard

The MD-83 aircraft was about an hour into its flight from Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso to Algiers. It was carrying 110 passengers and six crew members.