Transportation Secretaries Past And Present Sign Open Letter To Congress | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Transportation Secretaries Past And Present Sign Open Letter To Congress

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Congress may be on the verge of passing a short-term extension to keep the Highway Trust Fund from running out of money.

The fund that pays for road and transit maintenance and construction will run out of money next May at the latest. That means Congress will once again be faced with a choice: pass another temporary extension or approve a long-term transportation program.

Speaking at the National Press Club in downtown Washington, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx made clear which he prefers: "I am urging the American people to say no more delays. No more gimmicks. No more short-term patches or band-aids. Build our country, put us to work, and get America moving again."

Foxx and 11 former DOT secretaries who have served the past seven presidents signed an open letter to Congress asking for a long-term investment in roads, bridges, and rail lines.

Foxx continues to push the administration’s 4-year, $300 billion plan that would pay for transportation through corporate tax reform, not raising the gas tax.

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