Transportation Secretaries Past And Present Sign Open Letter To Congress | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Transportation Secretaries Past And Present Sign Open Letter To Congress

Play associated audio

Congress may be on the verge of passing a short-term extension to keep the Highway Trust Fund from running out of money.

The fund that pays for road and transit maintenance and construction will run out of money next May at the latest. That means Congress will once again be faced with a choice: pass another temporary extension or approve a long-term transportation program.

Speaking at the National Press Club in downtown Washington, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx made clear which he prefers: "I am urging the American people to say no more delays. No more gimmicks. No more short-term patches or band-aids. Build our country, put us to work, and get America moving again."

Foxx and 11 former DOT secretaries who have served the past seven presidents signed an open letter to Congress asking for a long-term investment in roads, bridges, and rail lines.

Foxx continues to push the administration’s 4-year, $300 billion plan that would pay for transportation through corporate tax reform, not raising the gas tax.

NPR

Glow-In-The-Dark Treats To Light Up Your Halloween

Two entrepreneurs have developed new tricks to make food that's literally illuminating, using ingredients that are as natural and unprocessed as possible. It's just basic food chemistry, folks.
NPR

Glow-In-The-Dark Treats To Light Up Your Halloween

Two entrepreneurs have developed new tricks to make food that's literally illuminating, using ingredients that are as natural and unprocessed as possible. It's just basic food chemistry, folks.
NPR

Want Your Absentee Vote To Count? Don't Make These Mistakes

About one in five voters now mail in their ballots, but many get rejected because they arrive late, the voter forgets to sign the form or the signature does not match the one on record.
NPR

Drones Are Taking Pictures That Could Demystify A Malaria Surge

How is a rare strain of malaria spreading near cities in Southeast Asia? That's the question that's been puzzling a team of scientists. And they're using drones to find the answer.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.