WAMU 88.5 : News

Organization Raises Big Dollars For McDonnell Legal Defense Fund

Play associated audio

In Virginia, former Republican Governor Bob McDonnell is in the midst of what is likely to be has last campaign—this one in federal court.

Financial disclosure forms show an organization called the Restoration Fund is raising money to support the legal defense for embattled former Governor Bob McDonnell. In the first quarter of the year, the fund took in about $150,000; in the second quarter it raised $93,000.

"They need money to fight McDonnell's case, so they are appealing to people who have supported the governor and would generally support Republicans," says Geoff Skelly, a political analyst with the University of Virginia Center for Politics.

The disclosure forms show the fund has spent more than $20,000 in legal services this quarter compared to $140,000 in the previous quarter. The top donor to the fund is Richard Baxter Gilliam, an executive in the coal business who was one of the governor's supporters when he was raising money in the political sphere. Now he's raising money for a different cause.

"There is a campaign element to all this. During hearings they tried to make this look like a partisan attack on the governor to perhaps influence the jury along political lines," Skelly says.

Jury selection in the trial starts on Monday.

NPR

Not My Job: Sharon Jones Gets Quizzed On Handshakes

We've invited the lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings to play a game called "Let's shake on it."
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
NPR

5 Takeaways From The Democratic National Convention

As conventioneers head home after a dramatic DNC, here are 5 takeaways from Philadelphia.
NPR

How Your Health Data Lead A Not-So-Secret Life Online

Apps can make managing health care a lot easier, but most don't have the privacy protections required of doctors and hospitals. And a simple Web search can clue in advertisers to health concerns.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.