Chromebooks And Tablets On The Way To Montgomery County Classrooms | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Chromebooks And Tablets On The Way To Montgomery County Classrooms

Play associated audio
A student using a Chromebook, much like the ones that will soon be a common sight in Montgomery County classrooms.
Kevin Jarrett: https://flic.kr/p/bkj6xW
A student using a Chromebook, much like the ones that will soon be a common sight in Montgomery County classrooms.

The Montgomery County Board of Education has signed off on a plan to purchase 40,000 laptops and tablets for students.

Over the next three school years, students from grades three through 12 will receive Chromebook laptops, while those in kindergarten through 2nd grade will get Android-based tablets. The goal is to incorporate technology into everyday learning.

Dr. Erick Lang, the head of curriculum and instructional programs for the school system, says having the computers will allow teachers to test students faster after lectures and also allow them to give — and get — immediate feedback.

"As adults we're critically thinking, problem-solving, communicating, and analyzing information everyday. And we should expect our students to do that everyday in the classroom," Lang says.

Each student will be given a secure account to sign in to their device, allowing staff to monitor what they do and prevent them from going to unauthorized websites. For the upcoming school year, students in grades 3, 5, and 6 will get the laptops, as well as high school students only for social studies classes. The rest of the devices will be handed out in future school years.

The roughly $15 million price tag for the laptops and tablets is already included in the budget the county council authorized for the school system.

NPR

Former Basketball Player Scores As A Filmmaker

While Deon Taylor was playing professional basketball in Germany, he had an epiphany: he wanted to make movies. The self-taught director's latest film, Supremacy, was released this Friday.
NPR

Surströmming Revisited: Eating Sweden's Famously Stinky Fish

Sweden has the distinction of producing surströmming, one of the foulest-smelling foods in the world. More than a decade ago, NPR's Ari Shapiro tried eating it and failed. It's time for a rematch.
NPR

What Romney's Retreat Means For GOP Hopefuls

NPR's Scott Simon speaks with senior Washington editor Ron Elving about the narrowing Republican presidential field for 2016 and what we've seen so far in the first month of the new Congress.
NPR

The Infinite Whiteness Of Public Radio Voices

The hashtag #publicradiovoices, about the "whiteness" of public radio, trended on Twitter this week. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch team about the conversation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.