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The Next Battlefield Of The Great Uber Wars: Annapolis, Md.

Uber has attracted regulators' ire in cities and states across the country, and Annapolis has stepped up to tell the ridesharing service that it has to register as a taxicab service.
WAMU/Chris Chester
Uber has attracted regulators' ire in cities and states across the country, and Annapolis has stepped up to tell the ridesharing service that it has to register as a taxicab service.

The city of Annapolis wants ridesharing company Uber to stop operating in Maryland's capital until it registers as a cab service.

Riders connect with drivers using Uber's smartphone app. The company has been operating in Annapolis since May.

On June 25, acting City Manager Brian Woodward sent a letter to the company explaining city law, including a definition of a taxi as a vehicle for hire that carries seven or fewer people. The city wants Uber to submit an application for a taxicab license. The Capital reports that the city also says Uber needs to apply for a state motor-vehicle permit.

Uber spokeswoman Taylor Bennett says Uber is a technology platform, not a taxi company. She says Uber looks forward to "educating city officials'' and developing a solution.

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