The Next Battlefield Of The Great Uber Wars: Annapolis, Md. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

The Next Battlefield Of The Great Uber Wars: Annapolis, Md.

Uber has attracted regulators' ire in cities and states across the country, and Annapolis has stepped up to tell the ridesharing service that it has to register as a taxicab service.
WAMU/Chris Chester
Uber has attracted regulators' ire in cities and states across the country, and Annapolis has stepped up to tell the ridesharing service that it has to register as a taxicab service.

The city of Annapolis wants ridesharing company Uber to stop operating in Maryland's capital until it registers as a cab service.

Riders connect with drivers using Uber's smartphone app. The company has been operating in Annapolis since May.

On June 25, acting City Manager Brian Woodward sent a letter to the company explaining city law, including a definition of a taxi as a vehicle for hire that carries seven or fewer people. The city wants Uber to submit an application for a taxicab license. The Capital reports that the city also says Uber needs to apply for a state motor-vehicle permit.

Uber spokeswoman Taylor Bennett says Uber is a technology platform, not a taxi company. She says Uber looks forward to "educating city officials'' and developing a solution.

NPR

From The Ivy League To 'The X-Files': David Duchovny's Big Break

Before he became Fox Mulder, Duchovny was working on his Ph.D. in literature at Yale. He was going to be a poet — or maybe a novelist — or maybe a playwright ...
NPR

College Life Doesn't Have To Mean Crummy Cuisine, Says Dorm Room Chef

Sick of dining hall pizza, public health student Emily Hu taught herself how to cook — even with no oven. Now she's hoping to inspire her peers to pick up cooking skills and healthier eating habits.
NPR

For Colorado's Undocumented, The Wait At The DMV Just Got Longer

Last year, the state became the 10th to offer driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants. This year, Colorado Republicans made it virtually impossible for those immigrants to get a slot at the DMV.
NPR

In Sweden, Remote-Control Airport Is A Reality

Sweden is the first country in the world to use new technology to land passenger airplanes remotely. At an airport in a tiny town, flights are guided by operators sitting miles away.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.