FCC Extending Net Neutrality Commenting Time After Site Buckles | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

FCC Extending Net Neutrality Commenting Time After Site Buckles

Play associated audio

A flood of comments about net neutrality crashed the Federal Communications Commission's commenting site on Tuesday, the original deadline for public comments on the controversial Internet proposal. But the tech problems are buying those who want to weigh in some extra time — the deadline for public commenting is now Friday at midnight.

Of the 780,000 comments submitted to the FCC, 100,000 came on Tuesday alone, which the FCC's outdated electronic comment filing system was not capable of handling.

"Just to be sure that everyone can have a chance to submit their comments, we are extending the deadline," FCC spokesman Mark Wigfield said.

On the table is a proposal that would allow Internet providers, like Comcast, to charge content companies, like Netflix, extra fees to deliver faster content to consumers.

This is one of the most heavily commented-on policy items the FCC has ever considered, but it's unlikely to surpass two other notable FCC-related events. Two million comments were registered on media deregulation. And the FCC received 1.4 million comments about Janet Jackson's infamous Superbowl wardrobe malfunction 10 years ago.

The commenting site is available here.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

For This Puzzle, Watch Your Words

The challenge is a game of categories based on the word "watch." For each category provided, name something starting with each of the letters W-A-T-C-H.
NPR

Cheez Whiz Helped Spread Processed Foods. Will It Be Squeezed Out?

Turns out, the history of Kraft's dull-orange cheese spread says a lot about the processed food industry — and where it might be headed as Kraft and Heinz merge.
NPR

Indiana Governor: Lawmakers To 'Clarify' Anti-Gay Law

Mike Pence, who signed the controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act last week, says he didn't anticipate the level of hostility the law has engendered.
NPR

App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.