WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Residents Of D.C. Neighborhood Mourn Grocer Killed By Robbers

A shrine for James Oh has popped up outside the store in 16th Street Heights that he ran for 20 years.
Armando Trull/WAMU
A shrine for James Oh has popped up outside the store in 16th Street Heights that he ran for 20 years.

Many residents of the 16th Street Heights neighborhood are mourning the murder of a beloved grocery store owner.

For 20 years, D.C. grocer James Oh joked with customers, gave free candy and ice cream to neighborhood kids, and if you didn't bring enough to pay the bill, the honor system allowed you to pay later.

The store is now closed and a shrine full of flowers, candles and hand-written missives express sorrow over Ohs beating and murder on the evening of July 4. Oh, known in the neighborhood as Pop Pop, was gun-butted over the head after he handed over $3,000 to two robbers. The criminals had beaten his wife and thrown her to the ground minutes before.

D.C. police have posted a video of the suspects and offered a $25,000 reward.

One note outside the store, signed in childish scrawl with green and pink flowers says, 'Thank you for all the ice cream and candy. You are so special." It's signed, "Isabella."

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

Oyster Archaeology: Ancient Trash Holds Clues To Sustainable Harvesting

Modern-day oyster populations in the Chesapeake are dwindling, but a multi-millennia archaeological survey shows that wasn't always the case. Native Americans harvested the shellfish sustainably.

NPR

Twitter Just Turned VP Nominee Tim Kaine Into Your Dad

Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Tim Kaine introduced himself to America Wednesday night as a fighter, Hillary Clinton's ally and — your dad.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.