Fly Like An Eagle: Site Picks The Best Aerial Drone Photos | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Fly Like An Eagle: Site Picks The Best Aerial Drone Photos

An eagle soars above a national park in Bali, Indonesia. A waterfall in Mexico is seen from above its shelf of cascading water. Those are the top two finishers in a contest held to find the best images captured by cameras mounted on aerial drones. The winners were recently unveiled by the site Dronestagram.

The website chose winners by two methods: a juried competition, and the images' popularity among the site's visitors (see the top three images in each category). The contest was sponsored by National Geographic France.

One image, taken at low altitude in Manila, Philippines, captured the smiles of kids and others watching a drone hover above them.

"Went back to my hometown in the Philippines," the photographer, identified as jericsaniel, wrote. "I was flying in the park one Sunday morning when suddenly people had become really interested with my drone."

Another image captures the sunset over the picturesque French town of Annecy, south of Geneva, Switzerland.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Novel Explores A Time When A Woman Might Not Live To Meet Her Child

Katy Simpson Smith's novel, set during the American Revolution, was inspired by her research on mothers in the South. "Death was sort of the specter that haunted every aspect of life," she says.
NPR

Nestle Nudges Its Suppliers To Improve Animal Welfare

The world's largest food company is requiring all of its suppliers of dairy, meat, poultry and egg products to comply with tighter animal welfare standards. Animal rights groups applaud the move.
NPR

Week In Politics: James Foley And Ferguson

Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
NPR

Coming Soon To A Pole Near You: A Bike That Locks Itself

Cyclists may soon have a convenient way to discourage bike thieves, thanks to new designs that use parts of the bikes themselves as locks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.