At Independence Day Parades, Expect Floats, Flags — And Politicians | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

At Independence Day Parades, Expect Floats, Flags — And Politicians

If you make it out to a parade today expect to see the region’s lawmakers asking for your vote.

Independence Day is a day for rest, barbecues and celebration for most of us — but not all of us. “For me it is the busiest day of the year," says Northern Virginia Democratic Congressman Gerry Connolly.

For most every lawmaker the Fourth of July is a working holiday, especially in an election year. For Connolly his day will start with a couple parades.

“And then there are a lot of neighborhood events. I’m going to try to make as many as I can, although a lot of them unfortunately are sort of scheduled for the same time. So I wish I had the gift of bilocation because then I could do two at the same time, but I’m going to try to make as many events on July Fourth as I can," he says.

While Connolly is in a relatively safe district, if you venture to Alexandria or Herndon today you'll get to see four challengers duke it out on the parade route as they campaign for the region's two open congressional seats.

NPR

U.S. Officials Believe North Korea Was Behind Sony Hack

The recent attack on Sony Pictures' computer network that resulted in a flood of confidential data has its origins in North Korea, U.S. intelligence officials say.
NPR

Japan's Butter Shortage Whips Its Cake Makers Into A Frenzy

For the Japanese, Christmastime means sponge cake. But a nationwide butter shortage has lead to mandatory butter rationing, forcing cake bakers to seek out substitutes.
NPR

Satanist And Christian Holiday Displays To Go Up At Michigan Capitol

The situation has brought controversy — and energized Christians who realized that a planned Nativity scene was in danger of being canceled.
NPR

U.S. Officials Believe North Korea Was Behind Sony Hack

The recent attack on Sony Pictures' computer network that resulted in a flood of confidential data has its origins in North Korea, U.S. intelligence officials say.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.