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'Black Widow' Falls Short In Hot-Dog Eating Contest

Sonya Thomas, left, and Miki Sudo, right, compete at the Nathan's Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating contest at Coney Island, Friday, July 4, 2014, in New York. Sudo defeated the reigning champion Thomas by eating 34 hot dogs and buns.
(AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Sonya Thomas, left, and Miki Sudo, right, compete at the Nathan's Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating contest at Coney Island, Friday, July 4, 2014, in New York. Sudo defeated the reigning champion Thomas by eating 34 hot dogs and buns.

The Black Widow has been out-eaten.

Three-time defending champion Sonya Thomas lost her hot dog eating title Friday to Miki Sudo, who wolfed down 34 franks and buns in 10 minutes to win the women's division of the annual Nathan's Famous Fourth of July Hot Dog Eating Contest at Coney Island.

Thomas, of Alexandria, Virginia, was only able to devour 27 3/4 hot dogs and buns.

The men's competition was scheduled for early Friday afternoon.

Joey "Jaws'' Chestnut hopes to put away his competition by downing 70 hot dogs in 10 minutes. Matt Stonie, who finished second last year, will be back for another try at the top spot.

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