Luis Suarez Apologizes For Biting Rival At World Cup | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Luis Suarez Apologizes For Biting Rival At World Cup

Updated at 2:14 p.m. ET

Controversial Uruguayan striker Luis Suarez apologized Monday for biting Italian player Giorgio Chiellini in last week's World Cup soccer game between their two countries.

FIFA, soccer's governing body, suspended Suarez for nine games and fined him 100,000 Swiss francs (about $112,000) for the act, and banned him from any soccer activity for four months. Uruguay, playing without their star player on Saturday, lost to Colombia in the knockout stage of the World Cup being held in Brazil.

Chiellini himself said he thought the ban was "excessive," and on Monday, responding to Suarez's tweet, he tweeted:

Although Suarez appeared contrite in his apology, Uruguayans were firmly behind their beloved player. The country's president, Jose Mujica, called the punishment handed to Suarez a "fascist ban," and labeled FIFA "a bunch of old sons of bitches."

NPR's Lourdes Garcia Navarro reported last week: "Suarez ... grew up in abject poverty and many use that to explain why he's bitten players three times in his career now. But he's viewed as a hero in Uruguay."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Former Basketball Player Scores As A Filmmaker

While Deon Taylor was playing professional basketball in Germany, he had an epiphany: he wanted to make movies. The self-taught director's latest film, Supremacy, was released this Friday.
NPR

Surströmming Revisited: Eating Sweden's Famously Stinky Fish

Sweden has the distinction of producing surströmming, one of the foulest-smelling foods in the world. More than a decade ago, NPR's Ari Shapiro tried eating it and failed. It's time for a rematch.
NPR

What Romney's Retreat Means For GOP Hopefuls

NPR's Scott Simon speaks with senior Washington editor Ron Elving about the narrowing Republican presidential field for 2016 and what we've seen so far in the first month of the new Congress.
NPR

The Infinite Whiteness Of Public Radio Voices

The hashtag #publicradiovoices, about the "whiteness" of public radio, trended on Twitter this week. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch team about the conversation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.